Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 19th World Obesity Congress Bangkok, Thailand.

Day 1 :

  • Childhood Obesity

Session Introduction

Salina shelly

Chief Dietitian and Nutrition Consultant. PhD, MPH ,MS, (Food and Nutrition) Chief Nutritionist at Asgar Ali Hospital

Title: Malnutrition and its underlying causes among vulnerable populations living in the Makeshift site and in the host communities in Bangladesh Refugee camp
Speaker
Biography:

Dr.Salina Shelly is one of the most well renowned Dietician in Bangladesh, who had the privilege to serve some renowned celebrities and VVIP personnel of Dhaka City. She is a well presented, self motivated and confident Chief Nutritionist with 12 years experience in the field of clinical Nutrition and Dietetics. Having a proven track record of successfully promoting healthy eating habits to communities and suggest diet modifications to individuals. Dr.Salina Shelly has completed her PhD in 2016 from Victoria University. She also obtained her MPH, M.S. and B.Sc. in Nutrition & Food Science from University of Dhaka in 2010, 2005 and 2004 respectively. Her professional experience started in  Apollo Hospitals Dhaka as Senior Dietician from  March 2005 to November 2009. Afterwards she joined to Khwaja Yunus Ali Medical college and Hospital, Gastro Liver Hospital (now BRB Hospital) & Research Institute Ltd. as a Chief Dietitian and Head of Dietetics Department.

Abstract:

Acute and chronic malnutrition are associated with disease and death. Prevalence of malnutrition is positively correlated with children’s mortality rates in refugee camp (Kutupalong,Cox’s Bazar-Bangladesh). Children under 5 year  have the highest death rates of all refugee. It is thought that malnutrition related morbidity &mortality is preventable. Assessment of nutritional status with anthropometry is practical and acceptable on an international level. Further more research suggested that the ability to monitor a population over time helps identify the effectiveness of nutrition interventions. Baseline prevalence data and monitoring malnutrition are necessary to evaluated and implement adequate programme support to Myanmar refugees children’s in Bangladesh

An estimated a quarter of million refugee have been forced to flee Myanmar due to conflict and burning of villages without basic essentials. Nearly 340,000 Rohingya children are living in squalid conditions in Bangladesh camps where they lack enough food, clean water and health care facilities. Desperate living conditions and waterborne diseases are threatening for children’s  6 to 59 month. High levels of severe acute malnutrition among young children have been found in the camps. It is estimates, one in every five children under the age of five is suffering from acute malnutrition and about 14,500 suffer severe acute malnutrition.

Bangladesh is a developing country with huge population. It is very difficult to host this Rohingya population for a country like Bangladesh. As a result, Rohingyas and their children are not having basic rights to live their livelihood.

At the cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh refugees camps nutrition assessment are not conducted regularly ,how ever health agencies provide monthly growth monitoring . Acute and chronic malnutrition is very high in the largest  population in the new settlement cox’s bazar refugee camp.

Jessica J Lee

School of Medicine , Griffith University

Title: Obese children crave food and they will do anything to have it
Speaker
Biography:

Paediatric obesity is a complex public health issue that many health professionals find difficult to address and provide relevant treatment.  Current practice which recommends an increase in physical activity and a decrease in energy intake is a simple solution for a complex problem. Unfortunately, this simple approach has had little impact on the rates of paediatric obesity. Current paediatric obesogenic environments perpetuate weight gain in children by encouraging over consumption of negative food choices that are high in kilojoules and nutrient poor.  The aim of the study was to improve our understanding of the obese child and the role they play in their obesity.  Our findings revealed that obese children are highly food focused experiencing hyperphagia that drives their desire for food and perpetuates disordered food behaviours such as self-feeding, stealing food, hiding food, over eating and the use of a wide range of coercive behaviours to acquire the foods they desire.  Parents of obese children stated that their children love food, are always hungry, pester them for food repetitively and describe the child as having a food addiction.  Food consumes an obese child’s life, they think, talk and crave food constantly day after day and placing food restriction only creates negative behaviours.  The parents experience arguments, pestering, tantrums, verbal and physical abuse leading to negative psychosocial outcomes for both the child and parent. There needs to be more recognition of an obese child’s dependence on negative food choices which leads to the development of disordered food behaviours negatively affecting their weight gain.  Furthermore, parents are not equipped with the skill set to cope with the obese child’s behavioural issues and therefore health professionals need to be more understanding of the challenges that parents face when they try to reduce food intake and increase physical activity.

Abstract:

Paediatric obesity is a complex public health issue that many health professionals find difficult to address and provide relevant treatment.  Current practice which recommends an increase in physical activity and a decrease in energy intake is a simple solution for a complex problem. Unfortunately, this simple approach has had little impact on the rates of paediatric obesity. Current paediatric obesogenic environments perpetuate weight gain in children by encouraging over consumption of negative food choices that are high in kilojoules and nutrient poor.  The aim of the study was to improve our understanding of the obese child and the role they play in their obesity.  Our findings revealed that obese children are highly food focused experiencing hyperphagia that drives their desire for food and perpetuates disordered food behaviours such as self-feeding, stealing food, hiding food, over eating and the use of a wide range of coercive behaviours to acquire the foods they desire.  Parents of obese children stated that their children love food, are always hungry, pester them for food repetitively and describe the child as having a food addiction.  Food consumes an obese child’s life, they think, talk and crave food constantly day after day and placing food restriction only creates negative behaviours.  The parents experience arguments, pestering, tantrums, verbal and physical abuse leading to negative psychosocial outcomes for both the child and parent. There needs to be more recognition of an obese child’s dependence on negative food choices which leads to the development of disordered food behaviours negatively affecting their weight gain.  Furthermore, parents are not equipped with the skill set to cope with the obese child’s behavioural issues and therefore health professionals need to be more understanding of the challenges that parents face when they try to reduce food intake and increase physical activity.

 

 

  • Obesity In women

Session Introduction

Foong Ming Moy

Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Title: The associations of obesity with cardiometabolic risks and stress among multi-ethnic women in a developing country
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Moy currently works as Associate Professor in the University of Malaya.  Her research interests include Translational Research / Trials in the prevention of non-communicable diseases in the community setting, Workplace Wellness and the effects of lifestyle behaviours on non-communicable diseases.  Currently, she heads a cohort study comprising of almost 15,000 teachers from the Peninsular Malaysia.  Dr Moy has generated research grants amounting to more than RM3 million. She published more than 80 manuscripts in peer review journals. She initiated and established the University of Malaya Wellness Program in 2008 and coordinated the program until 2013.   She is a member of the editorial board of the Malaysian Journal of Nutrition. She also reviews manuscripts for both local and international journals.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Obesity has emerged as a public health epidemic over decades in developed countries.  Currently, developing countries are also experiencing an increasing trend in obesity.  Sedentary lifestyle and easy accessibility to highly palatable nutrient-dense foods create an environment that promotes overweight and obesity.  Stress, often arising from poor interpersonal relationships, job or unemployment stress, poor self-esteem, and low socioeconomic status has been associated with obesity and its comorbidities. This presentation will highlight the associations of obesity with cardiometabolic risks and stress among a group of multi-ethnic women in Malaysia. Methodology: This is the cross sectional findings of a teachers cohort study (n=14,228). This study was conducted in six states within Peninsular Malaysia. Multistage sampling was carried out to recruit participants from the school setting.  Data collection included a questionnaire survey and health assessment. Information collected in the questionnaire were socio-demographic characteristics, participants' medical history and family history of chronic diseases, teaching characteristics, lifestyle behaviours (smoking, alcohol consumption and physical activities), a food frequency questionnaire, the job content questionnaire (JCQ); depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS21); health related quality of life (SF12-V2) etc. Health assessment included anthropometric measurements, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, full lipid profile and fasting blood glucose.  All data were analysed using STATA 14.0.  Conclusion & Significance: The prevalence of overweight and obesity among the participants was comparable with the national statistics.  Obesity was found to be associated with cardiometabolic risks and stress.  Appropriate interventions should be implemented to control obesity in order to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

 

Anita S. Kale

Senior consultant, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology National University Health System, Singapore

Title: Obesity and pregnancy: A challenge for Obstetricians
Speaker
Biography:

Dr Anitha Kale is practicing Obstetrician and Gynaecologist. After completing basic medical degree and post graduate course in Obstetrics and Gynaecology from Mumbai University, India, She moved to U.K., worked there for 8 years. She was rewarded the Fellowship of Royal college of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. After leaving U.K, moved to Singapore.She has been working in NUHS since 2005. My area of special interest is maternal medicine and high risk pregnancy. She run the ‘High risk pregnancy’ clinics in NUH where we look after pregnant women with complex medical issues.She is also an Assistant Professor in the Yong Loo Lin School of medicine where my job scope includes teaching undergraduate medical students.

Abstract:

Obesity in women has a huge impact on fertility as well as pregnancy.

It is a known fact that obesity affects fertility adversely by inhibiting ovulation. Success rate of IVF is affected by body mass index. Once pregnant, obese women have higher risk of complications like gestational diabetes, pregnancy induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia, operative as well as caesarean delivery, thromboembolism and anaesthesia related complications. Obese women with metabolic syndrome are at an especially higher risk due to worsening of hypertension and blood sugar control that often happens with pregnancy, with serious implications to the fetus like intra uterine growth restriction and iatrogenic premature delivery.

We now come across increasing number of women of reproductive age group undergoing bariatric surgery. Pregnancies in these women after having undergone bariatric surgery are of considerable interest to Obstetricians. Generally, the prevalence of pre-eclampsia and gestational diabetes appears to be lower in women after bariatric surgery. There also appears to be higher prevalence of ‘small for gestation’ babies as well as babies with intrauterine growth retardation in these women. I will be talking about challenges faced while caring for obese women during pregnancy and child birth as well as managing pregnancy after bariatric surgery.

  • Obesity and Endocrinology
  • Prevention Of Obesity

Session Introduction

Richard Visser DC, PhD

CEO Vera Health Group and Former Minister of Health & Sport,Aruba

Title: On the Prevention of Obesity and a Philosophy for Healthy Living “The Aruba Project
Speaker
Biography:

During his distinguished career, Richard W. M. Visser DC, Ph.D. has focused on the pandemic of childhood obesity among various populations, working in consultation with other international experts. He studied the problem and implemented solutions from many perspectives: as a clinical researcher, academic and educator, activist and politician, entrepreneur, concerned citizen and parent. His work has made vital contributions to a greater understanding of the biological, sociological, and psychological factors surrounding childhood obesity.

Early in 2008, he was appointed by the Government of Aruba to head the Obesity Task Force, and a year later, he began his four- year term as Aruba’s Minister of Health, and Sport. Today Dr. Visser continues his innovative approach to healthcare by converging the exponential technological development going on right now with never before seen global connectivity.

Abstract:

Obesity as a disease has reached historical, maximal peak values, with nearly one-third of the world’s population suffering from obesity and obesity-related conditions. We are now witnessing the impact of this epidemic upon the global health status, with non-communicable diseases on the rise. We have also witnessed the shortcomings and failures of past actions taken when obesity is already present. In Aruba, a prevalence of 36% of childhood obesity was found in 2005, with a tendency to increase as compared to the data prior to 2000. Actions to improve heathy eating habits, reduce sedentary lifestyle and enable a social environment to prevent obesity were carried out in a systematic plan in the period from 2009 – 2013 and a positive change was observed in the incidence of obesity compatible with complete deceleration of the epidemic and improvement in health indicators. Through the lessons learned from the project as executed in Aruba, we demonstrate how a specific road map can be developed, implemented and highly successful in addressing the obesity epidemic. The roadmap includes the following steps: a population al basis- line study, an awareness campaign, an approved action plan by the stakeholders and Government, changes in infrastructure, the creation of an institute to promote a healthy lifestyle, an introduction to the Exercise is Medicine initiative, and a study of progress with ongoing monitoring.

Kaukab Azeem

Assistant Professor (v), Physical Education Department King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Saudi Arabia.

Title: Obesity management for quality of life
Speaker
Biography:

Dr.Kaukab Azeem is basically from Hyderabad, India and received his Ph.D
from Osmania University, India in the year 2006. He is currently working as
Assistant Professor (v) in Physical Education Department at the King Fahd
University of Petroleum & Minerals, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. Strong expertise in lecturing fitness/ health education, nutrition, sport activities, weight training, and other health & physical education courses. Dr.Kaukab had produced outstanding bodybuilders’ of National & International reputation and trained many top sportsmen as a fitness coach. Dr.Kaukab possessesstrong background in fitness & bodybuilding as a former bodybuilder and an International fitness & bodybuilding (AFBF) Coach/Judge & a university chief coach. He had won Gold medal in the International strength lifting championship at Kingdom of Bahrain, Feb 2015. Also honor in receiving Best teacher award 2015 at King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals, Saudi Arabia. Received Best research paper award at International Conference on Sports Medicine and Fitness from March 23-25, 2015 at Chicago, USA. Dr.Kaukab had recently awarded for his excellent services to the development of Sports Science by the Directors of Board of International Science Culture and Sport Association, Turley, 2017. Kaukab’s research work has a focus on strength training, aerobics, fitness performance, obesity and changes in body Composition. He is also serving as a supervisor for students M.Phil and Ph.D program. He has published numerous papers in scientific journals, and also invited as speaker in many International Conferences around the Globe and attended Pre-Olympic Congress at China 2008 and London 2012.

Abstract:

Obesity is lifestyle disease which is on the rise around the globe. Early prevention of obesity may ovoid many diseases i.e. Coronary heart disease and diabetes. Obesity is preventable and reverse-able. Obesity is classified as having a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or greater. (Yingxue C, & etal, 2015) Obesity affects people's health and leads to diseases i.e. high blood pressure, diabetes, and various cardiovascular diseases [5]. Obesity is a chronic disease and growing threat globally (K.Azeem & etal, 2015) [3]. American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Guidelines; Frequency: 3 to 5 days/week, Duration: 20 to 60 min/day, Intensity: 50% to 90% of aerobic capacity (VO2max), Mode: large muscle groups, continuous, aerobic capacity. (Guo Siqiang, 2017), investigated and reveals that the Combined exercise training appears to play a vital role in reducing the risk factors of cardio-vascular diseases in elderly women’s with hypertension [2]. (Dennis T, 2017) reveals that the weight loss plus combined aerobic and resistance exercise was the most effective in improving functional status of obese older adults [1]. Causes of obesity:  Obesity is generally caused by eating too much and moving too little. Moreover the following are the main causes of obesity; Imbalance of calories intake, poor diet, lack of activity, stress, lack of sleep, genetics, medical reasons and poor life style. Obesity statistics:  According to world health organization (WHO) stated that in the year 2016, more than 1.9 billion adults, 18 years and older, were overweight. Of these over 650 million were obese.  Furthermore interestingly 39% of adults aged 18 years and over were overweight in 2016, and 13% were obese [4]. Cardio-vascular diseases (CVDs) Number 1 cause of death globally. More people die annually from CVDs than any other causes.  An estimated 17.5 million people died from CVDs (WHO, 22 Sep, 2016). (Reviewed November 2016 by WHO), in 2012, an estimated deaths due to diabetes were 1.5 million and 2.2 million deaths were attributable to high blood glucose[4].  Obesity management: Exercise, diet and lifestyle. Health Benefits of Exercise: Reduces the risk of coronary artery disease & hypertension. Lower the blood pressure, Increase HDL cholesterol & lower LDL cholesterol. Greater cardiac output will able to deliver more blood to tissue. Longevity – greater life expectancy and increases metabolism rate. In conclusion, obesity is a worldwide problem. Lately, medical reports consider it as a disease that could lead to many serious health issues such as diabetes, heart problems, and blood pressure. So people should monitor and maintain their food intake, exercise daily and manage healthy lifestyle.

  • Ties Between Obesity and Diabetes

Session Introduction

Ma. Eugenia Garay-Sevilla

Departamento de Ciencias Médicas División Ciencias de la Salud. Universidad de Guanajuato. Campus León

Title: Serum carboxymethyllysine (CML) and its relationship with markers of oxidative stress and insulin resistance in newly diagnosed diabetic patients with obesity and normal weight
Speaker
Biography:

Garay-Sevilla ME. Has her experience for more than 20 years in the study of Diabetes Mellitus and its complication mainly advanced glycation end products; is a leader in Mexico in the study of these products. Also studies obesity and its comorbidities from early stages of life to adulthood. Besides studies obesity in adolescents and cardiovascular risk factors.

Abstract:

Elevated levels of circulating advanced glycation end products (AGEs) as CML are believed to play a major role in the pathogenesis of macrovascular and microvascular disease in diabetes mellitus [1]. Endogenous formation of AGEs is increased in diabetes as the result of hyperglycemia and increased oxidative stress in this condition. Recently, however, it has been demonstrated that food-derived AGEs play a major role in maintaining a high body pool of AGEs in diabetes [2,3].

The purpose of this study is to evaluated the serun CML and its relationship with dietary AGEs, markers of oxidative stress and insulin resistance in newly diagnosed diabetic patients with obesity and normal weight.

Methodology: The study was performed on 80 newly diagnosed diabetic patients with normal weight (n=40) and with obesity (n=40). Clinical and anthropometric evaluations were performed; a sample of fasting blood was obtained for measured  glucose, lipid profile, HbA1c, insulin, serum carboxymethyllysine (CML) and 8-hydroxy 2'-deoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG). The HOMA-IR was calculated acording to Matthews et al. [4]

Reminders of 24 hours was made to quantify the energy and nutrient consumption and AGE intake was calculated from a database  previously published by Uribarri et al [5].

Findings: The mean of age of total group was 48.5±7.3 year. The diabetic patients with obesity had higher levels of insulin (p<0.0001), HOMA-IR (<0.001), 8-OHdG (<0.00001), CML (<0.00001) and dietary AGEs. In the total group serum CML correlated positively with dietary AGEs  (r=0.27;p<0.018), BMI (r=0.31; p<0.006), HbA1c  (r=0.31; p<0.007),  HOMA-IR ( 0.63; p<0.0001) and 8-OHdG (r=0.44;p<0.001) (figure 1).

Conclusion: We found significant and strong associations between CML with metabolic control, HOMA-IR and markers of oxidative stress to DNA (8-OHdG). These results support the importance of performing prevention for the development of complications of diabetes since diagnosis.

Shaodong Guo

Associate Professor, Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Texas A&M University, Texas, U.S.A.

Title: Disease Mechanisms and Dietary Intervention for Obesity and T2DM
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Shaodong Guo is Associate Professor in the Department of Nutrition and Food Science at Texas A&M University College. He received his Ph.D. in Physiology from Peking University, China. Then he completed his postdoctoral research training in Genetics, Biochemistry, and Medicine in the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Harvard University, respectively. Dr. Guo was an Instructor in Medicine at Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School for two years prior to joining the faculty at Texas A&M Health Science Center. Currently, Dr. Guo serves as senior editor for the Journal of Endocrinology and Journal of Molecular Endocrinology, two major official journals of Endocrine Society of Europe, UK, and Australia, and he is the textbook chapter writer for Metabolic Syndrome edited by Rexford Ahima and published by Springer in 2016. Dr. Guo lab research focuses on insulin/glucagon and estrogen signal transduction, insulin resistance, gene transcriptional control of nutrient homeostasis, and cardiac dysfunction in diabetes. Dr. Guo has been working on the gene transcriptional regulation of metabolic homeostasis by insulin receptor substrate proteins (IRS) and Forkhead FoxO transcription factors and he has been funded by American Diabetes Association (ADA), American Heart Association, and the National Institute of Health of USA. He is a recipient of ADA junior faculty award, career development award, and Richard R. Lee Award. His work has been published in a number of journals including the JBC, Endocrinology, Hypertension, Diabetes, Circulation Research, AJP, MCB, and Nature Medicine, receiving more than 5,000 citations from the Google Scholar.

Abstract:

Insulin resistance serves as the major mechanism for the development of obesity, which is pandemic in population worldwide over the past decades, largely owing to over nutrition. Excess energy stores in the adipose tissue and other organs as lipids, promoting lipotoxicity and metabolic inflammation, activating intracellular protein kinases to impair insulin signaling components, and resulting in insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the key etiologic illness that defines “metabolic syndrome”, a set of interrelated disorders/issues, inclusive of obesity, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Following insulin resistance, a lot of patients with the metabolic syndrome sooner or later developed pancreatic β-cell failure, which triggers the onset of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its complications. Our cell- and animal-based totally studies demonstrate that insulin and its signaling cascades generally control cell growth, metabolism and survival through activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and phosphotidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K), of which activation of PI-3K-associated with insulin receptor substrate-1 and -2 (IRS1, 2) and subsequent Akt→Foxo1 phosphorylation cascade has a central function in control of nutrient homeostasis and organ survival. Inactivation of Akt and activation of Foxo1, through suppression IRS1 and IRS2 in a variety of organs following over nutrition, lipotoxicity, and inflammation may form a fundamental mechanism for insulin resistance in humans. This seminar discusses the premise of insulin signaling, resistance, and how excess nutrients and lipid signaling from obesity promotes infection and insulin resistance, selling organ failure with emphasis on the IRS and the forkhead/winged-helix transcription component Foxo1

  • Obesity and CVS Issues

Session Introduction

Govind Kulkarni

M.D (Med) Cardiology Fellow ( Sydney) Consulting Physicians, Diabetologist & Cardiologis

Title: FOURIER STUDY for new lipid lowering injectable drug PCSK9 INHIBITORS.
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Govind Kulkarni is M.D in internal medicine from India 1995-96. He completed cardiology research fellowship at sydney university in 1996-97. He is founder of Pulse diabetes obesity and cardiac relief centre Pune India . He is having interest in clinical research.He was principal investigator /co investigator of multiple diabetic and cardiac drug trials like ENGAGE AF FOR NEW ORAL ANTICOAGULANTS and other FOURIER STUDY for new lipid lowering injectable drug PCSK9 INHIBITORS.He was co investigator for multiple new oral anti diabetic drugs . He is running obesity reduction programme in Pune His special interest is in reversal of diabetes and obesity. He is senior consulting physician and metabolic disorder consultant in MAJOR HOSPITALS PUNE, MAHARASHTRA, INDIA

Abstract:

PCSK9 INHIBITORS

Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is an enzyme encoded by the PCSK9 gene in humans on chromosome 1. PCSK9 is ubiquitously expressed in many tissues and cell types.PCSK9 binds to the receptor for low-density lipoprotein particles (LDL), which typically transport 3,000 to 6,000 fat molecules (including cholesterol) per particle, within extracellular fluid. The LDL receptor (LDLR), on liver and other cell membranes, binds and initiates ingestion of LDL-particles from extracellular fluid into cells, thus reducing LDL particle concentrations. If PCSK9 is blocked, more LDLRs are recycled and are present on the surface of cells to remove LDL-particles from the extracellular fluid. Therefore, blocking PCSK9 can lower blood LDL-particle concentrations.

  • Genetic links of Obesity

Session Introduction

Archana Badve

Yoga Trainer, Lifestyle Coach & Nutrigenomic health adviser

Title: Nutrigenomics: Personalised Weight Management Approaches
Speaker
Biography:

Co-founder of Pulse Diabetes, Obesity &  Cardiac Relief Centre. Certified Nutritional & Corporate Wellness consultant since   2008 Chairperson Nutrition for POGS 2014 (Pune Obstetric & Gynecological Society ) Currently practicing as Nutrigenomic Health Advisor Area of interest Nutrigenomics , Yoga & Preventive Nutrition.

Abstract:

Since the completion of Human Genome Project, continuous efforts have been made to elucidate and decode their functionalities of the gens, to understand the cause or the origin of diseases. While experts still continue to study genes, a fair amount of light has been shed on the genetic factors responsible for disease development and progression, thus allowing scientists to design diagnostic and treatment tools employing this knowledge. From hypertension to cancer, genes can help to understand management of a disease in a more precise manner as compared to the conventional approaches alone. This science is known as Nutrigenomics. Nutrigenomics can aid in weight loss in individuals suffering from stubborn obesity and can provide useful insight into the metabolism of the individual. Such diet and exercise recommendations based on genetic analysis of an individual are also called as Personalised Diet/Exercise recommendations. Genetics can help us understand various useful aspects of diet and exercise plan, such as suitable Protein :Carbohydrate :Fats ratio in a person’s diet, responsiveness to high intensity exercises, circardian rythm and exercise responsiveness etc.

Such presonalised diet and exercise recommendations can certainly help individuals achieve weight loss in a more efficient, rapid and scientific manner.